Knives and Needles

Where Chefs can talk tattoos and Tattooers can talk food

Archive for the tag “Asia”

Asia Witherington Large

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I saw Asia on IG and had to get an interview with this beautiful and talented lady! Check out what inspires Asia cook and her thoughts on tattoos!

Molly: Tell me about yourself, please include what you are doing now

Asia: I am a born again Christian, child of God! I’m a mom of 3 and a newlywed wifey! In my past I was a tattoo artist of 17 years and a pinup model. I’m now a baker and established cake decorator and owner of Jireh Cakes!

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M: So how did you get into baking?

A: After surviving a tragic divorce and loosing everything I had down to my tattoo shop equipment, I was given an opportunity to cook and bake when looking for a new profession. The Lord basically threw baking in my lap! I hit the ground running and haven’t looked back since.

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M:  Wow, that takes guts. What do you enjoy most bout cooking?

A:  What’s not to enjoy. Cooking and baking is everything to me. Feeding others and helping them create happy memories! Mainly knowing its something God provided me with to survive. The Lord is really good.

M: So, what was your first tattoo?

A: At 15 I took a needle and thread with India ink I had from art class, I tapped a small yin and yang onto my left ankle. Hideous.

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M: Haha! Who do you admire in the tattoo industry?

A: Being in the industry for so long I have many people I admire. Since I’ve removed myself from that scene I don’t talk to anyone. I’m very out of the loop.

Clint Cummings, Johnny Jackson, Myke Chambers, Anthony Zamora, Zack Ross, David De La O (butter), Michael Oureque, Jesse Alvarado, Bunny Switchblade…the list goes on.

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M: If you could get tattooed by anyone right now, who would it be and why?

A: I’m out of space so there will be no more tattoos for this girl!

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M: Why do you think so many chefs are heavily tattooed?.

A: You can’t explain it, it’s just you are, or your not.

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M: I know you said space is limited, but what would your next tattoo be?

A: I do want to put Jehovah Jireh in a banner on an anchor on my left hand I did about 6 years ago. It comes from Genesis 22. God told Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac. He took his son to build an alter and obeyed Gods command. Just when he was about to sacrifice his son, he saw a ram tangled in the bush by him. God had provided for them. To thank The Lord, Abraham named where the alter was Jehovah Jireh because God provided for him. God provides for us all (hence Jireh Cakes). He will make a way out of no way and will turn our mess into His message!

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Thank you, Asia! You can catch more of Asia on FB or IG here…

Www.facebook.com/jirehcakes

Instagram:  @Jireh_cakes

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Are you a tattooed chef or a foodie tattooer who wants to share their work inside the kitchen or studio? Contact us at knivesandneedles@gmail.com, we would love to talk to you!

Cheers!

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Peas

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Peas are a classic side dish where I grew up. And I bet many people could say the same. This may be because the pea is one of the oldest cultivated vegetables. Archeologists say man as far back as 5,000 years have been eating the tiny green orbs. Over time cultivating them into a thousand different varieties around the world.

The origin of peas was hard to track down but most sources have quoted the Middle Asia and Near East regions from the north of India to Afghanistan and Iran to be ancient centers for agricultural development. The earliest evidence of pea consumption is said to be a cave in the Thai and Burmese border.

A few examples of pea usage through the ages:

Dishes like pea soup made from dried pea varieties were sold on the streets in ancient Greece.

The Chinese grew smaller peas and they could be eaten whole and raw.

The British bred many varieties, including white and yellow peas.

And the pea was the first vegetable to be canned. 

Peas can be eaten raw, steamed, stir-fried, mashed, stuffed into pastries, or in soup. They are very low in fat and high in phytonutrients which can lower the risk of stomach cancer and work as an anti-inflammatory. They are also a sustainable vegetable. Planting peas can give soil important nutrients and can be great for crop rotation. Yay for peas!

 

 Here is a recipe for one of my favorite ways to eat peas, good ol’ fashioned split pea soup!

 

Split Pea Soup

 

1/8c olive oil

1 large yellow onion, chopped

3 cloves of garlic, minced

2 Tbls dried oregano

2 carrots, medium diced

2 celery sticks, medium diced

4 red potatoes, medium diced

½ tsp salt

½ tsp black pepper

1 pound dried split peas

8c chicken or vegetable stock

½ pound thick cut bacon or ham, medium slices

Salt and pepper to taste

 Place a large enough stockpot (maybe about 4-5 quart stockpot) on the stove and turn the heat on medium high. Add the olive oil and let it heat up for about a minute. Add the onion, garlic, and oregano. Let the onions sweat for 2-3 minutes or until they start to turn translucent. Then add the carrots, celery, and potatoes. Add the salt and pepper and let them sauté for 2-3 minutes. After the vegetables have cooked for a couple minutes, add half of the split peas, chicken stock/vegetable stock and bacon/ham. Turn the stove up to high and bring to a light simmer. Turn heat down and simmer for 35 minutes. There will be some foam while the soup simmers, skim the foam off with a ladle or spoon. At the end of the 35 minutes, add the rest of the peas and keep the soup simmering for another 45 minutes or until the peas are at the desired softness. Stir the soup once in a while to keep the vegetables and meat from sticking to the pot. Salt and pepper to taste and serve hot with oyster crackers or a nice chunk of bread. Great for those winter nights, and it freezes nicely so make tons!

 

Photo by the talented Michelle Roberts, thanks Michelle!

Contact us if you have something you think we would want to share:

@knivesandneedles

knivesandneedles@gmail.com

Cheers!

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